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planarianfolk:

Skógafoss.

This was my personal favorite waterfall. Unfortunately almost all my pics of it are really blurry. But it’s worth noting that these were literally taken at midnight - the sun never completely sets during midsummer due to the latitude. It turned 12:00 just as I climbed up to the top.

engadget:

Samsung’s new UHD TV is the first to go from flat to curved on command
crispculture:

Akomplice Miss Cleo Tee - On Sale Now at JackThreads

crispculture:

Akomplice Miss Cleo Tee - On Sale Now at JackThreads

wolfliving:

http://mashable.com/2014/07/20/bistro-smart-feeder-cat/

*With cat facial-recognition technology, you’re Fluffy’s Zuckerberg.

engadget:

Solid’s vibrating handlebars navigate bike lanes on its 3D printed frame
engadget:

Europe approves Apple’s $3 billion takeover of Beats

discovergames:

lunarobverse:

A brilliant metaphor

No, seriously, this is a great analogy. Because in most jurisdictions, cyclists have the exact same rights, rules and responsibilities as drivers. In Colorado, for example, there isn’t even a separate chapter of the statutes to deal with bikes - the regular traffic code simply applies to bikes as well. There are a few bike-specific sections, but for the most part, cyclists and drivers are legally indistinguishable. 

But the funny thing is that, even though bikes and cars have perfect equality at law, the roads and other infrastructure are still clearly made for cars, and bike commuting is really dangerous because of that. Well, that and the fact that drivers don’t actually think cyclists deserve that equality, and will shout, honk and drive dangerously close to them, to express their displeasure at cyclists who have the audacity to demand that they be treated equally and not killed.

Ooh, but there’s even more perfect to this analogy. Because while most cities and towns are built entirely around cars, a select few have taken a few small measures to help cyclists, like bike lanes and dedicated traffic signals. These of course exist simply to stop ignorant drivers from killing us because they are impatient and aggressive, but they still complain about the “special treatment” afforded to cyclists (For the analogy, think affirmative action or legislation regarding violence against women).

And when such safety measures aren’t in place, cyclists often do things like running red lights and stop signs, because we’re much less likely to be killed if we establish ourselves in the lane before the light turns green. Again, these are measures to ensure we’re not killed by ignorant assholes, but of course drivers then scream at us that we should be “following the rules.” Oh, you mean the rules like how you’re supposed to give us three feet of clearance to pass and the rules that say we’re not only allowed but required to ride in the lane? Those rules, that you break and misunderstand 90% of the time? Apparently, the rules only matter when they advantage the majority.

Okay, I’ll stop now. But clearly, the danger of bike commuting is something I’ve dealt with and thought about before.

Kinda similar to being a nice guy

astonmartinmotorclub:

Aston Martin is today confirming a bespoke product programme for a new super saloon that will see the revival of the historic Lagonda nameplate in a strictly limited series.

astonmartinmotorclub:

Aston Martin is today confirming a bespoke product programme for a new super saloon that will see the revival of the historic Lagonda nameplate in a strictly limited series.

astonmartinmotorclub:

Aston Martin is today confirming a bespoke product programme for a new super saloon that will see the revival of the historic Lagonda nameplate in a strictly limited series.

astonmartinmotorclub:

Aston Martin is today confirming a bespoke product programme for a new super saloon that will see the revival of the historic Lagonda nameplate in a strictly limited series.

jtotheizzoe:

generalelectric:

Pictured above is the world’s largest indoor farm illuminated by LEDs, which opened this month in Japan. Inside, 18 cultivation racks reach 15 levels high, and are outfitted with 17,500 GE LED light fixtures developed specifically for this facility. The indoor farm can grow lettuce two-and-a-half times faster than an outdoor farm, and is already producing 10,000 heads of it per day. Read more about this breakthrough in modern farming at GE Reports.   

Can you imagine showing this to a farmer who was alive and planting just 50 years ago? They’d think we were space aliens.