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engadget:

Formula E to let teams build their own batteries and motors
engadget:

Next year’s Hondas will have Tegra and Android inside
fromquarkstoquasars:

The International Space Station Welcomes its First Female Cosmonaut
She’s the first woman cosmonaut on the ISS, and she doesn’t put up with silly questions about hair and makeup. Watch her shut down some foolish reporters, and get to know her a little better, at:http://bit.ly/ZkL2sN

fromquarkstoquasars:

The International Space Station Welcomes its First Female Cosmonaut

She’s the first woman cosmonaut on the ISS, and she doesn’t put up with silly questions about hair and makeup. Watch her shut down some foolish reporters, and get to know her a little better, at:
http://bit.ly/ZkL2sN

medresearch:

3-D Printed Prosthetics: Crowdsourcing a Solution for Disabled Kids
Johns Hopkins Medicine hosts event for 3-D printing enthusiasts who provide kids with affordable and durable prosthetic hands.

Most kids take swinging a baseball bat for granted. For children missing a hand or fingers due to congenital disabilities, that simple act can feel like reaching for the stars. Prosthetic limbs are expensive and quickly outgrown, leaving many families without options. But recently, a group of volunteers and professionals joined forces to put more durable, less constrictive and much less expensive prosthetic hands within the grasp of thousands of children — all for free.

On Sept. 28, 2014, Johns Hopkins Medicine hosted a symposium titled Prosthetists Meet Printers: Mainstreaming Open Source 3-D Printed Prosthetics for Underserved Populations. The event included workshops on strategy, techniques and policy regarding 3-D prosthetics. Johns Hopkins trauma surgeon Albert Chi, the e-NABLE organization, the Kennedy Krieger Institute and other leaders in medicine and industry donated 3-D printed prosthetics to children with upper limb differences.

The event brought 21st century practices and technologies to almost 500 prosthetists, printer owners, parents, kids and wounded warriors. It provided a forum for 3-D printer owners who donate free prosthetic limbs, allowing them to share specs and meet with the professionals and families who can benefit from their work.

Read more »

Photos: Three-year-old Rayden Kahae was born with fingers missing on his right hand because of a condition called amniotic band syndrome. (source URL)

bmwusa:

52 M cars, 1 epic course. Watch as we initiate the M4 into the #BMWFamily. #MRated

beautifullyengineered:

BMW F30 M3 + F32 M4 Engine Components (S55B30)

happinessbythekilowatts:

Source Video: BMW M Initiation

toocats:

New three-tone camouflage for Iranian Air Force Islamic Republic of Iran Air Force (IRIAF) F-14 Tomcats.

via Global Military Review

toocats:

Polyus - Soviet military orbital weapons platform, developed in response to the US “Star Wars” progam. Launched May 15, 1987. Re-entered the atmosphere due to software malfunction, burning up over the Pacific.Designed to launch nuclear space mines, act as the core of a Mir-2 space station, and armed with a self-defense cannon. Mikhail Gorbachev, who inherited the program from previous Soviet leaders, expressly forbade the testing of it’s systems on-orbit. Nonetheless, had it orbited, there would likely have been major stresses in the already strained US-USSR relations.

via Encyclopedia Astronautica

toocats:

Operation Acoustic Kitty

1960’s CIA operation to attempt to use cats for spy missions. A battery and microphone were implanted in the cat, with an antenna run along the back and tail. It was intended for the cat to record and transmit sound from it’s surroundings. The first Acoustic Kitty eavesdropping mission was attempted in a park outside a Soviet compound in Washington, DC. The cat was released nearby, but was almost immediately hit and killed by a passing taxi. Due to the inability to train a cat to behave as required, the project was declared a total failure and cancelled in 1967.

via National Security Archive and Wikipedia